Hack. Hustle. Design.

Zooka Creative Gives Back

By Jeffrey Heid

Hack. Hustle. Design. Streetcode Academy believes these are the key components for a wider, better future. A future that doesn’t just include the rich, fortunate, digital native, uber-educated, English speaker, or people of specific color born in certain places.

These components are meant to invite every person to seek a greater future.

That’s why on July 21st, we invited Streetcode to bring their students to Zooka and learn the what’s, why’s and how’s of an ad agency in the 21st Century.

Streetcode Academy recognizes, diagnoses, and occupies the distinct lack of accessible high-tech training for youth and young adults in communities of color. They combat this by offering free, high-quality tech education classes in coding, entrepreneurship, and creativity.

Hack. Hustle. Design.

We wished to give back to those communities and help Steetcode in their mission.

From young children to ESL adults, dozens of eager faces attended several mini-classes created by our different departments.

Our designers, led by Art Director Sean Lopez, gave quick lessons on design principles, walking students through the design process of a sample logo we created just for them.

This process includes the often painful step of eliminating weaker ideas to discover what’s strongest.

Our virtual reality team described the unique potential of VR, giving everyone the chance to walk the virtual plank of our mixed reality experience.

Over the course of the afternoon, our visitors learned about everything from design and VR, to content and social media, to branding and web development.

Many asked smart, thoughtful questions about our processes and strategy. Some told stories about their struggles with the quickly and ceaselessly changing landscape of technology.

But everyone left with smiles and the hope for a better, brighter future.

 

This post originally appeared as a blog with Zooka Creative.

Hear from Steve Decker, Zooka’s head honcho at the VMA Design Conference, June 15, as part of AIGA’s SF Design Week.

Cooper Hewitt Names Ten Winners Across Disciplines in National Design Awards

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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has named the winners of the 2018 National Design Awards, recognizing design excellence and innovation in 10 categories. The annual program promotes design as a vital humanistic tool in shaping the world and is accompanied by extensive educational programs in cities nationwide. “All ten of this year’s winners present a powerful design perspective and body of work that is at once inclusive and deeply personal, accompanied by great achievement, humanity and social impact,” said Caroline Baumann, director of Cooper Hewitt.

School of Visual Arts posters for the New York City subway, designed using a quote supplied by the collegeís executive vice president, Anthony P. Rhodes, to celebrate President Obamaís call to greatness (New York, New York, 2009). Project partner: Terry Allen (illustrator). Photo: Courtesy of Gail Anderson
School of Visual Arts posters for the New York City subway, designed using a quote supplied by the college’s executive vice president, Anthony P. Rhodes, to celebrate President Obama’s call to greatness (New York, New York, 2009). Project partner: Terry Allen (illustrator). Photo: Courtesy of Gail Anderson

 

Anderson has coauthored thirteen books with design historian Steven Heller, including Type Tells Tales, The Graphic Design Idea Book, New Vintage Type, and the upcoming Type Speaks. Photo: Courtesy of Gail Anderson
Anderson has coauthored thirteen books with design historian Steven Heller, including Type Tells Tales, The Graphic Design Idea Book, New Vintage Type, and the upcoming Type Speaks. Photo: Courtesy of Gail Anderson

Of particular note to the graphic design community, Gail Anderson is recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award. Currently creative director at Visual Arts Press, SVA’s inhouse design studio, and a partner at Anderson Newton Design, Anderson has excelled as a designer, writer and educator, co-authored 14 books on design and popular culture, lectured internationally, and received numerous awards from the likes of AIGA, Society of Illustrators, Society of Publication Designers, Type Directors Club, Art Directors Club, Graphis, and Communication Arts. In addition, her work is included in the permanent collections of the Cooper Hewitt, Library of Congress, and the Milton Glaser Design Archives at SVA. She has been featured in magazines that include Computer Arts (UK), designNET (Korea), kAk (Russia), and on the January 2010 cover of GDUSA.

United States Postal Service postage stamp, commemorating the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. The final stamp was laid out at Americaís oldest working letterpress, Hatch Show Print, using period-appropriate typefaces (2013). Project partners: Antonio Alcal· (art director); Jim Sherraden (printer). Photo: Courtesy of Gail Anderson
United States Postal Service postage stamp, commemorating the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. The final stamp was laid out at Americaís oldest working letterpress, Hatch Show Print, using period-appropriate typefaces (2013). Project partners: Antonio Alcal· (art director); Jim Sherraden (printer). Photo: Courtesy of Gail Anderson

 

Spread from Cash, a book designed by Andersonís team at SpotCo for Jason Fine at Rolling Stone shortly after Johnny Cashís passing. Project partners: the Cash family, Sam Eckersley, Bashan Aquart, Darren Cox, Jessica Disbrow, editors and writers from Rolling Stone. Published by Crown Publishers (2004).
Spread from Cash, a book designed by Andersonís team at SpotCo for Jason Fine at Rolling Stone shortly after Johnny Cashís passing. Project partners: the Cash family, Sam Eckersley, Bashan Aquart, Darren Cox, Jessica Disbrow, editors and writers from Rolling Stone. Published by Crown Publishers (2004).

Pictured Top: Spread from Rolling Stone celebrating a young Chris Rock in full Jimi Hendrix mode, one of close to 500 feature stories and 300 covers Anderson worked on during her 14 years at the magazine under art director Fred Woodward (October 2, 1997). Project partner: Mark Seliger (photographer). Photo: Courtesy of Gail Anderson

In addition to Anderson, the National Design Awards winners are:

Communication Design: Civilization

Civilization was founded by Michael Ellsworth, Corey Gutch and Gabriel Stromberg in Seattle. Since the studio’s inception in 2007, it has built identity systems, digital experiences, printed materials, environmental graphics and exhibitions that are engaging , empathetic, sustainable and create meaningful connection.

Take Action poster series wheatpasted around cities nationwide. Available for download from the Shout Your Abortion website (2016). Photo: Courtesy of Civilization
Take Action poster series wheatpasted around cities nationwide. Available for download from the Shout Your Abortion website (2016). Photo: Courtesy of Civilization

 

Social Medium exhibition identity at the Frye Museum (Seattle, Washington, 2014). Photo: Courtesy of Civilization
Social Medium exhibition identity at the Frye Museum (Seattle, Washington, 2014). Photo: Courtesy of Civilization

Design Mind: Anne Whiston Spirn

Spirn is an award-winning author, landscape architect, photographer and the Cecil and Ida Green Distinguished Professor of Landscape Architecture and Planning at MIT in Cambridge MA. Her writings and action research provoke the integration of city and nature, advancing design theory and practice, and transforming how people see and act.

The Granite Garden, a book that ìtouched off the ecological urbanism movement,î according to the American Planning Association, which lists it as one of the most important books of the past century. The book presents, synthesizes, and applies knowledge from many disciplines to show how cities are part of the natural world and to demonstrate how they can be planned and designed in concert with natural processes rather than in conflict (1984, Basic Books; e-version, expected 2019).
The Granite Garden, a book that touched off the ecological urbanism movement, according to the American Planning Association, which lists it as one of the most important books of the past century. The book presents, synthesizes, and applies knowledge from many disciplines to show how cities are part of the natural world and to demonstrate how they can be planned and designed in concert with natural processes rather than in conflict (1984, Basic Books; e-version, expected 2019).

 

Stills from Buried River, Opened Lives: Reflections on People, Place, and Practice, a series of short multimedia videos where Spirn served as the director and in which participants in the West Philadelphia Landscape Project tell their own stories: reflecting on then and now, and on the impact the project has had on their lives (2013-2014). Photo: Courtesy of Anne Whiston Spirn
Stills from Buried River, Opened Lives: Reflections on People, Place, and Practice, a series of short multimedia videos where Spirn served as the director and in which participants in the West Philadelphia Landscape Project tell their own stories: reflecting on then and now, and on the impact the project has had on their lives (2013-2014). Photo: Courtesy of Anne Whiston Spirn

 

Architecture Design: Weiss/Manfredi

Founded by Marion Weiss and Michael A. Manfredi, the firm seeks to expand the territory of architecture by connecting landscape, art, infrastructure and architecture. The firm’s projects, including the Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park, Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s Visitor Center, Penn’s Nanotechnology Center, Cornell Tech’s Tata Innovation and the US Embassy in New Delhi, fuse architecture and nature.

Seattle Art Museum: Olympic Sculpture Park integrates art, architecture, infrastructure, and ecology in a new model for urban sculpture park. The continuous landform connects a museum pavilion, two bridges, site specific collaborations with world renowned artists, and a waterfront beach with a restored salmon habitat (Seattle, Washington, 2007). Photo: Benjamin Benschneider
Seattle Art Museum: Olympic Sculpture Park integrates art, architecture, infrastructure, and ecology in a new model for urban sculpture park. The continuous landform connects a museum pavilion, two bridges, site specific collaborations with world renowned artists, and a waterfront beach with a restored salmon habitat (Seattle, Washington, 2007). Photo: Benjamin Benschneider

 

Barnard College Diana Center, a creative arts building that links a series of diagonally interconnected double-height public spaces. Extending the campus lawn upward through the building, the Diana Center creates a luminous lens on the campus and the city (New York, New York, 2010). Photo: Albert Ve?erka/Esto
Barnard College Diana Center, a creative arts building that links a series of diagonally interconnected double-height public spaces. Extending the campus lawn upward through the building, the Diana Center creates a luminous lens on the campus and the city (New York, New York, 2010). Photo: Albert Ve?erka/Esto

Fashion Design: Christina Kim

Kim is the co-founder and designer of dosa, an LA-based clothing, accessories and housewares company with a focus on rethinking conventional fashion-industry production and sustaining artisan cultures. In-house production enables an evolving system for efficient use of natural resources, recycling and creative reuse. Kim draws on traditional handwork techniques, particularly in India, Mexico and Colombia, engaging local artisans and communities in long-term collaborations.

dosa x We Kiss, an installation of We Kiss shawls and handmade pieces in a range of pinks at Tiina the Store (Amagansett, New York, 2017). Project partners: Tiina Laakkonen; Kathy Klein. Photo: Tiina Laakonen
dosa x We Kiss, an installation of We Kiss shawls and handmade pieces in a range of pinks at Tiina the Store (Amagansett, New York, 2017). Project partners: Tiina Laakkonen; Kathy Klein. Photo: Tiina Laakonen

 

Life of Jamdani, 5% waste Indian muslin textile making (India and Los Angeles, California, 2003ñongoing). Project partners: Rajka Designs; Devi Export. Photo: Mark Schooley
Life of Jamdani, 5% waste Indian muslin textile making (India and Los Angeles, California, 2003–ongoing). Project partners: Rajka Designs; Devi Export. Photo: Mark Schooley

Interaction Design: Neri Oxman

Oxman is an architect, designer, inventor and professor at MIT, where she is the founding director of The Mediated Matter Group, an experimental design practice. The group combines commissioned work with scientific research, exploring ways in which digital design and production techniques can enhance the relationship between built and natural environments, operating at the intersection of computational design, robotic fabrication, materials engineering and synthetic biology.

Fiber Pavilion, a prototype structure autonomously fabricated by 16 fiber winding robots over the course of two days at the MIT Media Lab (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2017). In collaboration with The Mediated Matter Group, MIT Media Lab. Photo: Courtesy of Neri Oxman and The Mediated Matter Group
Fiber Pavilion, a prototype structure autonomously fabricated by 16 fiber winding robots over the course of two days at the MIT Media Lab (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2017). In collaboration with The Mediated Matter Group, MIT Media Lab. Photo: Courtesy of Neri Oxman and The Mediated Matter Group

 

Mushtari, a 3D printed wearable that can change color, create food, and produce biological tissues, such as insulation for the body, designed to enable human survival on distant planets and environments. Part of the Wanderers series, the wearable skin combines a continuous internal network of biocompatible fluidic channels with variable optical transparency through the use of bitmap-based multi-material additive manufacturing (2015). Project partners: The Mediated Matter Group, MIT Media Lab; Stratasys, Ltd. Photo: Yoram Reshef. Courtesy of Neri Oxman and The Mediated Matter Group
Mushtari, a 3D printed wearable that can change color, create food, and produce biological tissues, such as insulation for the body, designed to enable human survival on distant planets and environments. Part of the Wanderers series, the wearable skin combines a continuous internal network of biocompatible fluidic channels with variable optical transparency through the use of bitmap-based multi-material additive manufacturing (2015). Project partners: The Mediated Matter Group, MIT Media Lab; Stratasys, Ltd. Photo: Yoram Reshef. Courtesy of Neri Oxman and The Mediated Matter Group

Interior Design: Oppenheim Architecture + Design

Founded in 1999 by Chad Oppenheim, Oppenheim Architecture + Design is an architecture, planning and interior design firm specializing in hospitality, commercial and mixed-use, retail and residential buildings worldwide. The firm creates spaces that evoke the senses, catering to both pleasure and performance. Inspiration is drawn from vernacular styles and local resources are asserted with minimal gesture.

ENEA Headquarters, designed to demonstrate respect towards the elements of nature at the site (Rapperswil-Jona, Switzerland, 2010). Photo: Martin R¸tschi
ENEA Headquarters, designed to demonstrate respect towards the elements of nature at the site (Rapperswil-Jona, Switzerland, 2010). Photo: Martin R¸tschi

 

La Muna, a private residence with minimal impact on natural resources that effortlessly merges with its surroundings (Aspen, Colorado, 2011). Photo: Laziz Hamani
La Muna, a private residence with minimal impact on natural resources that effortlessly merges with its surroundings (Aspen, Colorado, 2011). Photo: Laziz Hamani

Landscape Architecture: Mikyoung Kim Design

Kim is the founding principal of Mikyoung Kim Design, an international landscape architecture and urban design firm. Over the past two decades, the firm has crafted an award-winning body of work that redefines the discipline of landscape architecture and inhabits the intersection of art and science. Its projects solve challenging urban resiliency issues while always considering the unique character of place making.

Farrar Pond Garden, situated within a three-acre native hardwood forest overlooking Farrar Pond. The design seeks to harmonize contemporary materials and design elements with a native plant palette and natural kettle and kame geology. The sculptural Cor-Ten fence flows through openings in the forest, both defining and blurring boundaries (Lincoln, Massachusetts, 2009). Project partner: Schwartz Silver Architects. Photo: Christopher Baker
Farrar Pond Garden, situated within a three-acre native hardwood forest overlooking Farrar Pond. The design seeks to harmonize contemporary materials and design elements with a native plant palette and natural kettle and kame geology. The sculptural Cor-Ten fence flows through openings in the forest, both defining and blurring boundaries (Lincoln, Massachusetts, 2009). Project partner: Schwartz Silver Architects. Photo: Christopher Baker

 

ChonGae River Restoration Project, a regenerative, seven-mile green corridor provides resiliency to the hydrological systems of the city. The river source point is a symbolic cultural representation of the future reunification of North and South Korea within a highly active public plaza, framed by local stone from each of the nine provinces of North and South Korea (Seoul, Korea, 2009). Project partner: SeoAhn Total Landscape. Photo: Robert Such
ChonGae River Restoration Project, a regenerative, seven-mile green corridor provides resiliency to the hydrological systems of the city. The river source point is a symbolic cultural representation of the future reunification of North and South Korea within a highly active public plaza, framed by local stone from each of the nine provinces of North and South Korea (Seoul, Korea, 2009). Project partner: SeoAhn Total Landscape. Photo: Robert Such

Product Design: Blu Dot

Blu Dot was founded in 1997 by friends John Christakos, Maruice Blanks and Charlie Lazor. Their mission is to design and manufacture furniture that is useful, affordable and brings good design to as many people as possible. Recognized for its inventive use of materials, fabrication technology and assembly methods, Blu Dot produces furniture that is determined by an economy of means while maintaining a playful sensibility.

Dang Collection, contemporary consoles and media stands featuring perforated steel door fronts that enable the use of remotes without compromising the design (Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2011). Photo: Dan Monick
Dang Collection, contemporary consoles and media stands featuring perforated steel door fronts that enable the use of remotes without compromising the design (Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2011). Photo: Dan Monick

 

Hot Mesh Chair, featuring powder-coated steel that creates a bold graphic pattern inspired by handwoven rattan and a simple, stackable tubular frame that maintains the clarity of form (Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2012). Photo: Dan Monick
Hot Mesh Chair, featuring powder-coated steel that creates a bold graphic pattern inspired by handwoven rattan and a simple, stackable tubular frame that maintains the clarity of form (Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2012). Photo: Dan Monick

Corporate & Institutional Achievement: Design for America

Design for America is a national network of innovators working together to improve their local communities through design. Begun as the brainchild of Northwestern University faculty member Liz Gerber, Gerber saw how design could be used to bring new solutions to seemingly intractable social issues. The network has tackled hundreds of challenges, ranging from accessible health care to drinkable water, and has inspired students, educators and design professionals across the country.

Jerry the Bear, an interactive companion to help children with type 1 diabetes understand how to take ownership of a complex disease. The idea was developed by Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung while students in Design for America at Northwestern in response to a DFA project focused on children with type 1 diabetes. Jerry comes with eight injection sites, a sticker to attach a virtual insulin pump, and educational augmented reality games to play on a free mobile application (2009–present). Project partner: Sproutel. Photo: Courtesy of Sproutel
Jerry the Bear, an interactive companion to help children with type 1 diabetes understand how to take ownership of a complex disease. The idea was developed by Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung while students in Design for America at Northwestern in response to a DFA project focused on children with type 1 diabetes. Jerry comes with eight injection sites, a sticker to attach a virtual insulin pump, and educational augmented reality games to play on a free mobile application (2009–present). Project partner: Sproutel. Photo: Courtesy of Sproutel

 

Illumiloon, a low-tech, floating communication device that shows a signal for help without power or the Internet. The project was designed by students in the Design for America studio at Yale in response to Hurricane Sandy and Blizzard Nemo to address the social challenges around natural disasters (New Haven, Connecticut, 2014ñpresent). Project partners: Federal Emergency Management Agency; Field Innovation Team. Photo: Courtesy of Illumiloon
Illumiloon, a low-tech, floating communication device that shows a signal for help without power or the Internet. The project was designed by students in the Design for America studio at Yale in response to Hurricane Sandy and Blizzard Nemo to address the social challenges around natural disasters (New Haven, Connecticut, 2014ñpresent). Project partners: Federal Emergency Management Agency; Field Innovation Team. Photo: Courtesy of Illumiloon.

This article originally appeared in GDUSA.

“Neo mint” will be the color of 2020 says forecasters

Trend forecasting service WGSN has revealed that a pastel shade of green, coined “neo mint”, will dominate the worlds of fashion and interiors in 2020.According to the trend forecaster, which is headquartered in London, neo mint is a gender-neutral color with “an oxygenating, fresh tone that aligns science and technology with nature”.

Neo mint is a tone of green, similar to the one used in this Japanese acupuncture clinic by id inc in Tokyo. Photograph is by id inc

The color was picked by WGSN‘s team of forecasters following extensive research that included observing street fashion, big data, current affairs and social media.

“What is becoming clear is the importance of neo mint – a shade that succinctly aligns futuristic development with nature,” WGSN’s color director Jane Monnington Boddy told Dezeen.

Events slated to take place in 2020 – including the completion of the world’s tallest building in Saudi Arabia; the start of NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover mission; and the introduction of Uber’s flying taxis – helped the team to pinpoint neo mint as an important color for the dawn of the next decade.

Perforated cladding in a neo mint shade wraps this university science institute by Cláudio VilarinhoPhotography is by Joao Morgado

Telling Dezeen about the process of composing a color forecast, Monnington Boddy explained how data harvested from online retailers is used in tandem with images posted on social media.

“Our retail analytics division, WGSN Instock, can track the sales of online retailers and analyze which colors are selling well,” she explained to Dezeen.

“We’re also trying to use social media as a vehicle to find out what’s happening in colour. In the past we used to go out on the street and look at what people are wearing, which we still do, but now we also look at influencers on Instagram.”

WGSN tracks the evolution of color trends

Color trends, Monnington Boddy said, have a trickle-down effect. What is seen at an interior during the Salone del Mobile in Milan, or on the catwalk during global fashion weeks may not hit the high street for another couple of years.

Similarly, WGSN believes that the current political climate and images seen on the news can influence the colors we wear, with the popularity of the color red on the autumn and winter catwalks in 2017 a result of the 2017 Women’s March.

“I’ve already seen neo mint popping up in younger fashion-forward brands, and in a few more years time it will start to filter into high street stores. Like all trends, it will evolve and grow,” she continued.

 

Five Metrics That Prove Social Media Is Working For Your Business

by Matthew Goulart. Founder of Ignite Digitial, an experience-driven digital agency.

If you aren’t using social media for your business, you’re doing something wrong. To put it into perspective, Statista reported that of the 3.17 billion people using the internet, 2.3 billion are active social media users. In other words, if your business isn’t using social media as a marketing tactic, you’re limiting your potential reach.

However, simply creating an account on the most popular social media platforms won’t instantly move you out of the fools’ category. Social media marketing takes strategy, persistence, time, effort and measurement. To ensure your social media efforts are paying off, and more importantly, to determine which tactics work and bring the highest ROI, here are five key metrics to watch closely.

Conversions

Every company wants to see conversions. Whether it’s direct marketing or social media marketing, if it doesn’t convert, it has no purpose. While this point can be argued when it comes to social media, there is no denying that conversions are still a top priority. Conversions show the number of people who took the extra step and entered your sales funnel via your social media page. This can be gauged by tracking website traffic, online sales, registrations completed, subscription forms submitted, etc.

To convert, you must first have effective calls-to-action to entice your audience and get them engaged with your content. Then you need to use an analytics tool, such as Google Analytics to track and monitor their engagement. Once integrated into your website, you can see how many people reached your website via your social media and what kind of social media content is bringing in the highest conversions.

Search Volume

What better way to determine if your social media marketing strategy is working than using search volume metrics? Search volume allows you to see how many people are searching for your company on search engines. This is an important tactic because you’ll be creating an online presence, and as a result, consumers will be searching for your company online. Search Engine Land reported that 85% of consumers have used the internet to find local businesses. Therefore, if you aren’t seeing a spike in searches for your company, your social media marketing strategy needs to be revised.

There are various tools you can use to track search volume, with Google offering some of the best. Google Analytics and Google Trends are two tools that can monitor the changes in search volumes. These tools can provide you with valuable knowledge on how to engage customers better, as they also analyze your direct competitors and compare their results with yours.

Brand Presence, Image And Engagement

We can’t say it enough: Simply having a social media account won’t get you the results you’re after. In order to capitalize on these modern-day marketing tools, you need to learn how to use them to build a strong online presence in order to further engage with your customers. The secret to social media is to connect with your consumers on a personal level. By doing so, you can build trust and loyalty, brand your company’s image, and ultimately, increase engagement.

Furthermore, not all interactions are positive and you need a strategy to address negative feedback. In order to do that, you need to have a tool to track the remarks, comments and statuses on social media that could tarnish your brand. Tools such as Facebook Insights, Twitter Analytics, Google’s Me on the Web Tool, and Social Mention allow you to monitor your online reputation in seconds. Some will also send you notifications when a certain keyword is associated with your company, such as scam or fraud.

Followers And Likes

One of the easiest ways to keep track of your social media marketing is by checking your number of followers and likes. If you have a high number of followers and they’re consistently growing, your social media campaign is essentially working. However, it’s just as important to monitor the number of likes your content garners to ensure your followers are also interacting with your brand.

Scanning through every single one of your social media posts on a regular basis just to measure likes can be a daunting task. Instead, there are analytic tools provided by the platforms that do this for you. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram all offer analytics right on each platform. However, you can also use third-party tools such as the Epoxy app, Klout widget or Social Blue Book website to track your followers, likes and social media presence as a whole.

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Return On Investment

The best thing about social media marketing is that you don’t have to spend a dime to see a return on investment. It’ll take time and effort, but it can be a cost-efficient marketing tool. You can complement your time and effort with paid advertisements or by hiring a social media marketer to capitalize using your social media strategy. Either way, whether time or money spent, you want to make sure it’s worth it.

Tools such as Kissmetrics, Google Analytics and the analytics tools provided by social media platforms are excellent for monitoring ROI. These systems will show you data such as which social media campaigns are the most profitable, which social media ads perform best, which individuals or group of individuals convert, and much more. As such, you’ll be able to invest your time and/or money more strategically moving forward.

Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn – there certainly is not a shortage of social media platforms to choose from. As a rule of thumb, pick from the most popular and the ones specific to your niche. If your business is highly visual, use visual-focused platforms such as Instagram and Pinterest. If your content is based on text, Facebook and Twitter may be the better option. Then implement a strategy that incorporates these five key metrics to ensure your social media tactics are as powerful as they can be.

PR, media strategy, creative & advertising execs share trends & tips Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

The Era Of Creative Work Is Just In The Beginning

It iPhoto by kychan on Unsplash

It is slowly becoming a feasible option to make a living from creative work.

According to a UN study, the ‘creative economy’ — that is the part of the economy, which trades in any kind of goods and services that are of creative nature — was a $547 billion industry in 2012.

The study concludes that the creative industry has been growing by an average of 8.6 percent per year between 2003 to 2012 and continues to do so, “despite the economic deceleration of the world economy”.

In the few years since then, a lot has changed.

Companies like Patreon, which allow creators to monetize their work on a membership basis, have been launched. Services like Amazon CreateSpaceare becoming more and more of a viable alternative to traditional publishers.

Youtube now provides a full-time income for thousands of video producers worldwide. Anybody can now sell their music anytime, using services like Spotify, iTunes, Google Play or Amazon.

Painters can auction their artworks through a large variety of online services. Any kind of creator can sell merchandise to their fans through services like Teespring or Redbubble.

In short, new ways of monetizing our work keep popping up every single day.

And, more importantly, competition among such service providers, becomes more and more fierce, every single day.

This is good news for us. The more service providers are competing for creators to use their services, the more beneficial the conditions for creatives, are going to become.


But let’s go a little bit back in time…

As Jack Conte, CEO of Patreon, has said in his TED Talk:

“The whole machine in 2013 that took art online and outputted money, was totally non-functional. It didn’t matter if you were a newspaper, or an institution, or an independent creator. A web comic with 20,000 monthly readers, would get paid a couple of hundred bucks in ad revenue”.

His argument was that until a few years ago, most companies were focused on providing the infrastructure to store different kinds of arts, and distribute it in various different ways.

These were companies like shipping businesses, marketing firms, record labels, book publishers and so on and so forth.

But then, platforms started to develop, which made it possible for creators to directly share their work with their fans. No longer was it necessary for any kinds of creators to make use of a middleman, who would take care of marketing and distribution.

Within a few years, this whole distribution infrastructure that existed for a long time, was completely bypassed.

Since then, there simply was not enough time for a new system to develop, which provides a reliable way of monetizing creative work.

While new service providers are slowly showing up in every single industry, they simply didn’t have enough time to evolve to the point, where they can provide for a decent living for masses of creative people.

Right now, only the top few percent of creatives on these platforms, are truly earning a decent living.

Soon, a large percentage of these creatives, will.


When doing creative work becomes a ‘normal’ career choice….

Today, most people are still shocked, when their children announce to them, that they want to be an artist. The fear of their children ending up poor, is simply too strong.

Being an artist, regardless of what kind of art it is, is simply not considered to be a stable and secure career choice.

Jack Conte believes, that our generation will be the first to witness a change in this situation.

And I want to believe it with him.

I don’t know if it is going to be Patreon, which is going to make the change. But I believe that the competition among all those service providers, will get the infrastructure to the point, where most artists (if they are really hardworking and keep pushing forward) can live off their work.

With that, I don’t mean becoming rich.

I think that if becoming rich is one’s goal, then becoming an artist is the wrong career choice, in the first place. All I am talking about is being able to make a living, to the point, where we don’t have to worry much about money.

The ability to make a living, by doing the thing we love the most.


Our responsibility

Having said that, I also believe that all of us, who want to turn our passion into a career, have a responsibility.

We can not just rely on other parties to make it possible for us, to make a living off our art.

That would make us dependent.

That would make us depend on being children of the right circumstances.

Once we are in that mentality, we have already lost. It is only when we recognize that it is us, who have to take control over our own destinies, that we have a chance of ever getting anywhere.

As Benjamin Disraeli famously said:

Circumstances are beyond human control, but our conduct is in our own power.

I think that you and me have as much responsibility to contribute to the infrastructure of making it possible to make a living from our art, as anybody else does.

That doesn’t mean that you need to become the CEO of one of these service companies.

All it means is that you need to step up in a way that is within your possibilities, and that make sense for you as a an individual.

Let me give you a very simple example.

Casey Neistat is one of the world’s most successful vloggers. Until recently, he has mostly been busy building his own vlog, while at the same time also running a media company.

Now, he has decided to start a new project called ‘368’. He has basically rented a massively huge office space in New York. There, he wants to build the necessary infrastructure, to bring on many smaller Youtubers, who can use the space to create their art.

So, he is building video production studios. Music production studios. And everything else that a creative space needs — sports facilities, relaxation areas, quiet work spaces and so on and so forth.

He wants to make it possible for these smaller video creators, to focus full-time on the process of creation, without being worried about money.

Now, he is inviting different people from different aspects of life to join him on this journey. Jack Conte, for example, has famously pitched Casey via a viral video, and basically offered for Patreon to somehow sponsor these smaller creators, in one way or another.

At the same time, Casey has now somehow convinced one of the founders of Reddit, to provide the necessary technical support to turn that project into reality.

Casey Neistat with Reddit founder Alexis Ohanian

Of course, these are all big names.

Most of us simply don’t have the resources to do something similar. But still, we all can do something, that is within the realm of our own power.

We all can step up and take responsibility for helping the community of creators. We all can take little steps, which will make it a tiny bit easier for artists to make a living off their art.

The question is: what little steps can YOU take, in order to help the community?

I’m not talking about something large here. I’m not asking you to invest a lot of your time and resources into something, in a way that will seriously disturb the work on your craft.

Especially, if you are still struggling to make a living yourself.

All I am saying is that if you want the infrastructure for creators to move forward, then you can not simply rely on other people, to do all the work for you.

You yourself have as much responsibility in this matter, as everybody else does. In the end, it is a task that we all need to tackle together. We, as creators, are responsible for turning our profession, into a real career choice.

We shouldn’t be dependent on anybody else.

As creators, we should also be the creators of our own fate.

After all, this is what we do best, isn’t it? Using creativity to solve difficult problems.


Conclusion:

First of all, let me say this: no matter what kind of art you are passionate about, you will make a living off your art one day (if that’s what you want).

We are part of the first generation, which is in the privileged position, that every single artist can reach people directly through a gazillion of different means, and therefore build their very own tribe.

But this is the mindset of dependency.

In the end, only you yourself can create your own destiny.

Michelangelo lived in the 15th century. At the time, artists were among the lowest classes of all. They were mostly looked down upon. Basically, they were used as tools by rich patrons, to show off how much ‘good taste’ they had for things of beauty.

What many people don’t know is that Michelangelo came from an aristocratic family, that had lost pretty much everything.

Michelangelo decided that he would restore the family honor. But since he couldn’t do that by re-entering the political arena, he did it by turning the whole artistic profession around.

He decided that he would not be treated as a ‘pet’ by powerful men. He even resisted the calls of the most powerful man of the time — the pope himself.

That was something unheard of at the time.

In the end, he had achieved much more than he ever set out to do. He became one of the most respected (and richest) men of his time. He became the creator of his own destiny, through sheer willpower and determination.

He was a man of action.

A man who would fight for his goals every single day.

“The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming…” — Theodore Roosevelt

Let’s all take responsibility for our own destiny.

And together create a future, in which being a creative, is a desirable career option, for anybody who wants to pursue it.


Call to action:

Jordan Gross and me have just recently started to create a community called struggling forward. We are a community for creators, who are helping each other through the process of going through the struggle, on the way towards our dreams.

Feel free to send an e-mail to rettigtim@gmail.com, in case you’re interested to participate in the community.

This article originally appeared in Art + Marketing.

How ridiculous is it to call yourself the CEO when your start-up is tiny?

Brett Fox

When I started raising money, and it was just me and my cofounders, I had business cards that I gave to prospective investors and employees. My title was CEO.

No one looked at me funny.

No one pointed at me and laughed.

And no one thought I was nuts.

Here in the United States, the leader is called the CEO regardless of the size of your company.

It’s actually a really simple question when you think about calling yourself the CEO. You’re the leader of the company, aren’t you?

I’ve seen CEOs get in trouble when they are afraid to call themselves the CEO because they are afraid to upset their other cofounders. Don’t be.

For example, maybe you’ve heard something like, “We’re a team of equals. We don’t have a CEO.” Good luck with that one.

Your team is expecting you to take control.

Every team needs a leader. You will have problems with your team if you don’t take control. Now, I’m not suggesting that you become some sort of crazed egomaniac.

I am suggesting that you assume the role of the leader. And part of assuming the leadership role is calling yourself the CEO.

You will find your fears about looking foolish will go away over time.

You are the CEO! What else would you call yourself but CEO?

Any other title is going to make you look weak. The more you act like a CEO, talk like a CEO, and tell people you are the CEO, the easier and more comfortable you will become with being CEO.

Never feel guilty or ashamed that you are the CEO of a small company. Every successful founder CEO started out that way.

This story originally appeared on Quora.

Best Buy Unveils Rebranding That Was a Year in The Making

 

Best Buy is tapping its own 100,000 blue-shirted employees as the stars of its new marketing campaign, a rebranding effort designed to highlight the retailer’s personalized customer service. On Wednesday, the Minneapolis-based electronics chain is rolling out a new website and logo, and will air TV spots later this week.

Best Buy puts the tag outside in new logo.
Best Buy puts the tag outside in new logo. Credit: Best Buy

“It’s really about building more aggressively toward serving customers and helping change lives with technology,” says Whit Alexander, a three-year veteran of Best Buy who was promoted to chief marketing officer last year. “We needed a way to tell the story a little differently through how we interact with customers.” Alexander says the new work, which has a “rallying cry” of “Let’s talk about what’s possible,” positions Best Buy as an inspiring friend that can help consumers achieve their goals.

Work on the campaign started roughly a year ago. The “big thrust” of the new work was done internally, notes Alexander, adding that Best Buy still works with a number of agencies including Redscout, Grey and Wunderman on creative strategy. Grey recently created Best Buy’s holiday campaign. Starcom handles media duties for the retailer.

Best Buy debuts new out-of-home ads.
Best Buy debuts new out-of-home ads. Credit: Best Buy

A year after consolidating its marketing department and eliminating the role of chief creative officer, Best Buy is back to bulking up its in-house creative team. In November, the company hired Bruce Bildsten, who spent two decades at agency Fallon, as executive creative director. The brand is in the process of hiring dozens more for the creative team.

“We’re proud of the internal team we’re assembling here,” says Alexander.

In a 30-second TV spot “Talk the talk,” Best Buy employees counsel customers. Everything in the video is black and white, save the bright blue shirts of the staffers. A 60-second version will air digitally, while 15-second clips will also debut on TV. Academy Award winner Errol Morris directed the videos.

The retailer has also debuted a new logo, after some 30 years. The Best Buy name, still in black letters, is outside of the yellow price tag, which retains a diminished location in the bottom right corner.

Best Buy representatives declined to specify the budget of the new push. Last year, the retailer spent $139.3 million on measured media in the U.S., according to Kantar Media.

Despite the crushing omnipresence of Amazon, Best Buy has been holding its own with consumers, thanks to a customer-experience-focused strategy that positions stores as showrooms. CEO Hubert Joly is credited with the plan, which he unveiled six years ago in an effort to transform the company for the modern age.

In the fourth quarter, Best Buy posted revenue of $15.4 billion, a nine percent rise over the year-earlier period. Online comparable sales, which represent 20 percent of U.S. sales, were up 18 percent for the period. Net income was $364 million for the quarter. It reports first-quarter earnings later this month.

For Illustrators, the iPad Pro Is (Almost) an Everyday Computer


Can an iPad Pro replace your laptop? Is it a computer or a tablet? A production machine or a toy? Those questions have been dogging the iPad Pro since it was introduced in autumn 2015. When the latest iPad Pro debuted in 2017, with a more robust version of iOS that included file management and improved multitasking, choosing either a MacBook or MacBook Pro or iPad Pro becameeven more difficult for mobile users because iPad Pro looked like it could (almost) do everything a laptop could.

iPad pro laptop or computer

iPad Pro user with Apple Pencil, multitasking, photograph copyright © 2018 Apple Inc.

So what exactly can iPad Pro do? Maybe a better question is What can’t it do? Apple’s commercial, What’s a computer shows how versatile the device is and by the end of the video, you might ask yourself if the word computer is relevant anymore. Yes, iPad Pro is capable of a lot and is a powerful tablet or laptop (or whatever) and by all accounts, it works like a computer. But if you’re an illustrator and you really want to see what it can do, take a look at how other illustrators are using it with the Procreate app.

iPad pro laptop or computer

Clovers by Nikolai Lockertsen, screen capture via Procreate Latest News

Hello, iPad Pro

When the original iPad debuted in 2010, it appeared to be a big toy, a grab-and-go device for browsing the web, reading, and playing games, as well as email and messaging. It’s gone through various iterations including the erstwhile iPad Air, as well as today’s iPad and iPad Mini—both of which MacRumors suggests not buying because updates might be coming soon. But when iPad Pro debuted in 2015, it looked a lot less like a toy.

iPad pro laptop or computer

Drawing on iPad Pro with the Apple Pencil, photograph copyright © 2018 Apple Inc.

Today’s iPad Pro comes with either a 12.9-inch or 10.5-inch diagonal display and that smaller model is larger than the standard iPad’s 9.7-inch diagonal display. The iPad Pro renders colors better and has a faster chip to power the heavy-lifting that graphics, paint, and video apps require. Compared to other iPad models, the iPad Pro is, simply put, just better—in all ways—especially when you couple it with add-ons. Pair an iPad Pro with a Smart Keyboard and it’s a laptop. With an Apple Pencil you can draw and annotate, and digitally paint in apps.

iPad pro laptop or computer

iPad Pro, Apple Pencil, and Smart Keyboard, photograph copyright © 2018 Apple Inc.

One Device to (Almost) Run It All

iPad pro laptop or computer

Illustration by Emma Berger

Emma Berger, who is an artist at Laika and freelance illustrator, has been a loyal iPad Pro user, and was an early adopter in 2016. “I had been researching different types of mobile Cintiqs as well as one stationed to a desk. I was skeptical about the iPad Pro until I used the Procreate application, and then the choice was pretty clear.” Berger calls her work “relatively low maintenance” and in addition to the iPad Pro, she uses a MacBook for Photoshop since it offers some functions not available on the iPad Pro. She also uses a scanner. But for the most part, her work happens on the iPad Pro. “For colored drawings I’ll use the iPad almost 100%. The linework will be done by hand and scanned, the rest will be completed on an iPad.”

iPad pro laptop or computer

Emma Berger, initial drawing

iPad pro laptop or computer

Emma Berger, completed illustration in Procreate

Berger will import artwork into her iMac and back into the iPad because according to her, “there are certain things that an apple pencil can never replace.” This is especially true when it comes to inking by hand, which requires her to scan the work and use Photoshop to prep the file. Then it’s off to the iPad Pro for coloring and lighting. “If I were to only use the iPad Pro for everything (and sometimes I’m still able, but no all the time) I would loose some of what makes my illustration unique.”

iPad pro laptop or computer

iPad pro laptop or computer

iPad pro laptop or computer
Illustration sketching, coloring, development, by Emma Berger

Photoshop has been and continues to be the de facto art, photo, and illustration application. And then there’s Procreate, which Berger calls “the closest thing to Photoshop, no doubt.” For Berger and other illustrators, Procreate is a smart, cost-effective option compared to Photoshop—and it can do an awful lot.

iPad pro laptop or computer

Autumn Dance by Goro Fujita, screen capture via Procreate Latest News

According to Berger, “Photoshop is crazy expensive and there are a lot of people who don’t need all of it’s amenities. That being said, I don’t think Procreate has surpassed it, nor will it do so in the future, but it is the next best alternative. In general, I think working on an iPad is also the next best alternative to the 3,000 one would normally have to put into a full Photoshop Wacom work station.”

Unlike Berger, Trudi Castle, is still very loyal to Photoshop. “For me personally, Photoshop is so powerful, has so many options, and is completely what I’m used to.” Castle is a concept and game artist living in Vancouver, Canada working at Red Hook Games on Darkest Dungeon. She began using an iPad Pro at the end of 2016 and was impressed by how great it felt to draw on with an Apple Pencil. She uses the iPad Pro for “sketching and roughing ideas” but “nothing final, ever.” The drawings she’s done, some of which are on her Instagram, are more sketchy and fun, such as the drawing done in Procreate below.

iPad pro laptop or computer

Trudi Castle’s drawing done on an iPad Pro with Procreate

“I’m super comfy doing art at this level of development on there, and maybe over time I will start to do more rendered images. But for now, it’s more like my fun program for when I’m sitting on front of the TV and relaxing,” says Castle.

End-to-End Creation & Production

Other illustrators such as Castle use an iPad Pro more recreationally, whether it’s with Procreate or Clip Studio. For Berger, Procreate does what she needs and it works for her, and yet she’s quick to point out that that it might not work for everyone, especially if your work “requires more detail, file size, or a different interface.” Even for the work she’s done almost entirely on an iPad Pro, Berger has to move between Photoshop and Procreate, from MacBook to iPad. But if you’re a creative nomad and freelancer who’s out and about, and who needs to be mobile, the iPad Pro can work for end-to-end production, and be your dedicated device. Nicholas Kole has been using it for just that.

iPad pro laptop or computer

Ristorante Humberto, created in Procreate on the iPad Pro, a personal project by Nicholas Kole

Freelance character designer and illustrator Nicholas Kole—who’s designed for the likes of Disney—has used an iPad Pro as his onlydevice. He’s able to get what he needs accomplished without having to lug around a laptop. And for the most part, he doesn’t even need to use a desktop computer. Yes, Kole does have an iMac that he occasionally uses for invoicing, email, and type setting. But for the most part, it’s all iPad Pro all the time.

iPad pro laptop or computer

Jellybots, a personal comic and character design project by Nicholas Kole, now a Patreon project

Before committing to the iPad Pro, Kole looked at the Microsoft Surface, but he had his doubts because of his long-time loyalties. “I’m an Apple boy, and have been since childhood—so I’ll confess my bias there. iOS just makes sense to me, and the Windows equivalents always frustrate my sense of the flow of menus and apps.” The Surface also had some odd interface issues, according to Kole. “At the time I tried a Surface, the device ran full-featured desktop versions of the apps I wanted to use. The unchanged desktop UI of Photoshop felt cluttered and hard to navigate on the smaller screen, with gestures and the stylus feeling like afterthoughts.” Castle, who had a Surface Pro 2, found it to be “no way near as portable or light” as the iPad, and she found that the Surface “could get as hot as the sun!”

Kole does his art and illustration from end-to-end on an iPad Pro with Procreate, and calls himself a “huge Procreate user” who believes in the app wholeheartedly. “When I stepped into Procreate—which has a lot of powerful features hidden from immediate view, and accessible through simple gestures designed well for the touch screen—it was a big shift towards embracing what the iPad does best and leaving behind the idea that it had to function exactly like a laptop. I like the overt simplicity and the ways in which it functions, at first, more like a sketchbook than a laptop.”

iPad pro laptop or computer

A sample of settings, development art, by Nicholas Kole from the Wingfeather Saga book series for Shining Isle Production

iPad pro laptop or computer

Nia Igiby, one of the main characters of Wingfeather Saga, drawn by Nicholas Kole for the recently completed animated short

Well-Tooled

If you’re an illustrator who is thinking about getting an iPad Pro as a companion to your laptop or desktop, it can be an expensive companion if you max out storage, get an Apple Pencil & Smart Keyboard, as well as AppleCare+ and cellular connectivity. But iPad Pro is still a lot less expensive than a 512GB MacBook Pro, and iPad Pro might be the only device you need.

Plenty of illustrators and Apple loyalists have an iPad ProMacBook Pro, and an iMac (or iMac Pro). But if you want one device that’s portable, versatile, and powerful, the iPad Pro could be your one and only computer, that’s also a tablet, laptop, toy, sketchbook, and camera—and a whole lot more.

iPad Pro product photographs via Apple Newsroom Press Releases, copyright © 2018 Apple Inc.

Procreate 4 screen captures via Procreate Latest News

This article was originally published in How Design.


Join us on June 15 for the VMA Design Conference during AIGA’s SF Design Week for lots more resources and inspiration.

5 Steps to Finding Your Next Big Idea from Spanx’s Sara Blakely

There’s a myth amongst entrepreneurs of the “lightning strike” — the “aha” moment when an idea just comes to you. In reality, it’s rare to find a successful scale entrepreneur whose big idea landed on their lap. It’s more likely they were already on the hunt.

If you want to find your big business idea, you have to surround yourself with the human equivalent of a pack of bloodhounds. And when you find yourself on its trail, follow the scent relentlessly. And be ready to act when you think you’ve found it.

I wanted to talk to Spanx founder Sara Blakely about my theory:

I believe there’s only one way to find your big idea: Look for it. Look for it. Look for it. And then act.

Her story of spotting, pursuing, and realizing her big idea is as legendary as it is unlikely. She came up with the idea for Spanx at the age 26 by cutting the feet off a pair of pantyhose. With no background in fashion, fabrication, or business, she grew it to a billion-dollar company that reinvented underwear — without ever taking outside investment.

Her story is the perfect parable for any entrepreneur looking for their first — or their next — big idea. Here are 5 key steps from Blakely from our conversation on Masters of Scale. If you’re not yet a listener, subscribe on Apple podcasts or find all of the episodes here.

Step #1: Clearly Define Your Purpose

“At 26, I was selling fax machines door to door for a living. I literally had a moment where I pulled off the side of the road and was like, ‘I’m in the wrong movie. This is not my life. Call the director or the producer. I’m not supposed to be being escorted out of buildings and having business cards ripped up in my face all day.’

And so I went home that night and I wrote down in my journal ‘I want to invent a product that I can sell to millions of people that will make them feel good.’ This was something that I set intention for. I had really asked the universe to give me an idea that I could bring to the world.

The Bigger Picture

Different people have different ways of expressing how ideas came to them. Sara will tell you that she asked the universe, and the universe answered. I would interpret it a bit differently. I’d say Sara kept asking the same set of interesting questions, starting with “Is this my big idea?” And one day, inevitably, the answer was going to be “Yes.”

Step #2: Always Be On the Hunt for Your Big Idea

I wanted to wear my cream pants to a party, and I was a frustrated consumer that had no undergarment to wear under them that wouldn’t show. So I cut the feet out of my own control top pantyhose so I could throw them on under my pants and wear any kind of great strappy heel. And it worked beautifully, except for they rolled up my leg all night at the party.I came home that night and I was like ‘This should exist for women.’

I meet women all the time that have been cutting the feet out of their pantyhose for years trying to solve undergarment issues for themselves. And they’re always like, ‘Why didn’t I do Spanx?’ And I really just think it’s because I had been looking for this and was prepared in my mind to go for whatever idea presented itself.”

The Bigger Picture

First, notice the words Sara used: “This should exist.” Those three words flicker like a neon flashing light over a truly big idea. They’re your clue that you’ve stumbled on something with real potential.

Sara had spent years scanning the horizon for that neon sign, and she was prepared to go for whatever idea presented itself. All the other women who had the same thought simply went to their party and back to work the next morning, leaving the neon sign “This should exist” behind them in the night.

And this gets to the heart of a major misconception around entrepreneurship. There is a myth that big ideas drop out of the sky, land in your lap, and transform you into a billionaire the next day. This almost never happens.

Yes, Sara did have a key moment of inspiration, in her bedroom getting ready for a party, and that matters. But you have to look at what happened before that moment. Sara had already oriented herself squarely in the direction of a big idea; she’d been on the hunt for the last 10 years. Whatever kind of idea you’re staking out, you have to be intentional about looking for it.

Step #3: Put Yourself in Situations Where Inspiration Is Most Likely to Strike

“I’ve identified where my best thinking happens, and it’s in the car. I live really close to Spanx so I’ve created what my friends call my ‘fake commute.’ I get up an hour early before I’m supposed to go to Spanx and I drive around aimlessly in Atlanta with my commute so that I can have my thoughts come to me. And I thought of the name Spanx in the car.”

The Bigger Picture

Sara knows that she does her best thinking in the car. So she intentionally creates the time and space — first thing every day — to open herself up to new ideas. This may seem like an interesting bit of trivia. But it’s more important than it seems. As an entrepreneur, you have to put yourself in situations where YOUR great ideas are likely to strike.

Step #4: Once You Find Your Big Idea, Pursue It

“I went to Neiman and Saks and asked: ‘You know, what do women wear under these white pants?’ And the sales ladies would always say, ‘Well, we don’t really know!’ or they’d point me in the direction of the shapewear that did exist and it was really thick and dreadful and too much control or not what I was looking for. And then there was like regular underwear, which left a panty line that was visible so there was this big gap.

So I was doing two things: I was trying to determine if there was a marketplace beyond just my own thought and what I wanted. And at the same time, I was iterating the product. I tried to make the prototypes myself. I went to fabric stores and bought elastic and tried to paper clip it to the end, and then I tried to sew it. It was through the iteration of the prototype that I really started to love it and love what it could do for my wardrobe.

I like to tell people that what you don’t know can be your greatest asset if you let it. If you have the courage. You know, a lot of us second guess ourselves and think ‘Well, I didn’t go to school for this’ or ‘I’m not an expert’ so we don’t ask the questions or we don’t pursue it.”

The Bigger Picture

You can’t scale an idea that only lives in your head. You have to act on it — because that’s the only way to find out if it has legs.

And great entrepreneurs know: Not every idea is going to succeed. But every idea should be treated like it could. You can only know in retrospect which ideas go the distance. But even if your first idea doesn’t take flight, it may land you at the doorstep of your next big idea.

Spanx may have started as normal pantyhose with the feet cut off, but that isn’t where it ended. The classic Spanx, which women by the millions now rely on, are the length and shape of bicycle shorts. They look great under pants and dresses, never creating seams or lines.

You could compare them to old-fashioned corsets, except that Spanx are breathable, flexible, and invisible under clothes. They’re architectural marvels. The waist lines have an incredible non-sticky grip that keeps them in place. The legs don’t roll up or show through clothes. But none of this existed yet when Sara first had the idea. She saw a gap in the market, and started building toward it.

Step #5: Find Help in the Right Places

“I didn’t tell anybody my idea for one year. I didn’t want to tell friends and family because I didn’t want to invite ego into the process too soon, and so I kept it a secret from everybody in my life and didn’t seek validation. But I did share it with manufacturers, patent lawyers, or people who could help me move it along. And by doing that, I didn’t spend my first year explaining it and defending it. I just spent it pursuing it.

An idea is its most vulnerable in its infancy, and that’s also the moment in human nature we want to immediately turn to our right or left and tell our coworker or friend or boyfriend or boss, you know, ‘I have this idea.’ And out of love and concern we hear a lot of things that stop us right in our tracks.

‘Well, sweetie, if it’s such a good idea why doesn’t it already exist?’ And ‘Well, you know, even if this idea does take off, Sara, you’re going to spend your savings, and the big guys will knock you out of the water in six months.’”

The Bigger Picture

It’s so important — for entrepreneurs and anyone with an outlier idea — to remember that not everyone has the entrepreneurial mindset. Many people will tell you, “That’s crazy. That’s risky. You’ll never succeed. Lots of people have tried this and failed. What makes you different? Why don’t you just take a nice safe 9-to-5 job?”

So if you’re the kind of person who gets discouraged or bullied out of your idea, you might want to do what Sara did — and keep it to yourself.

But there’s also a real advantage to feedback. I do my best thinking when I’m around people who challenge me, who poke holes in my ideas, and who can tell me where the landmines are.

It’s not that Sara didn’t have any input. She just figured out where to get the most useful input, from people who knew the ins and outs of the business. And she shielded herself from the kind of criticism that might have crippled her.

Reid Hoffman

Reid Hoffman Influencer

Find the original publication of this article on LinkedIn.

Join us on June 15th at the VMA Design Conference, part of AIGA’s SF Design Week for more inspiration.

How the Old Testament can sometimes be as handy as the HBR when rallying teams around your vision of the promised land.

Parting the Waters

Little did I know, as an altar boy growing up in Colorado, that I would eventually find myself teaching corporations to love the Old Testament. But, as it happens, the Decalogue (aka The Ten Commandments) have worked their way into nearly every high-level strategic engagement we’ve had the pleasure of being part of lately. How? Well, it all started while we were working with a tech company in the communication and collaboration space (who shall remain nameless for the sake of our NDA). The brief: help us figure out how to do a better job of helping people understand each other.

See, we’d been workshopping our way toward a new vision for the brand — a new rallying cry that was meant to drive everything from hiring decisions to the product roadmap. But when we started hammering at that vision with a broader array of doers within the company, we found that after the head-nodding stopped, the hands went up. Everyone got the big idea, but no one could agree on how to act on it. Or rather, everyone had their own (domain-specific) idea of how they might be able to bring it to life.

What was missing was a clearer, more defined code of conduct that laddered up to the vision without adding undue complexity. Nobody wanted some elaborate decision tree to determine whether something was going to get them fired or promoted. They just wanted some simple rules of the road that everyone could get behind and act on. Basically, not The Book of Exodus per se. Something a little more…tweetable.


So, we broke up our workshop group into five teams of 6 and gave them fifteen minutes to talk amongst themselves. The aim: come up with your own ten commandments for operationalizing the vision. Of course, because literally no one in the room could actually remember all original ten, we had to scramble to dig them up on Wikipedia (does that mean we’re going to hell?). For the rest of the heathens out there, here they are:

I am the LORD thy God.
Thou shall have no other gods before Me.
Thou shall make no graven images or likenesses.
Thou shalt not take the LORD’s name in vain.
Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy.
Honor thy father and thy mother.
Thou shalt not kill.
Thou shalt not commit adultery.
Thou shalt not steal.
Thou shalt not bear false witness.
Thou shalt not covet.

Wait. That’s eleven, right? Interesting. And that first one isn’t really a commandment, is it? Plus, it sounds like someone might be overcompensating a bit with all the ALL CAPS. Also of note: not all the commandments are punative. Some are positive. Amidst all the thou shalt nots are a few thou shalls. As in: Honor thy father and mother and remember the Sabbath day. Both good. I’m still not totally sure about the ‘graven images or likenesses’ bit. I mean, no Michelangelo? Come on…

Anyway, after a quick stroll through Moses’ backstory, we got back to work. And it was fascinating to see how quickly people grokked it. Surprisingly, there were a ton of similarities bubbling up, table-to-table. Every single group kept it to ten. But when we when we gathered them all together, winnowed out the duplicates, and combined the super similar ones, we still netted out at around 15. Maybe this is where we should’ve brought out a certain clip from History of the World Part 1.

Again, in the interest of protecting our NDA, let’s just say they spanned everything from simplifying the user’s life, to creating more delightful experiences, to experimenting more. And, interestingly, none required all-caps. Good. And none were punitive. All were positive. But still there were way, way too many to keep in your head. And a lot of them were pretty high-level still. A bit too open for interpretation.

So, how to simplify? With those fifteen (and the reams and reams of notes from our earlier sessions that day), we went back to our studio. After killing a few Post-It Notes and going back-and-forth with our client lead, we ended up chiseling things down to ten. Then, five. Why five? Because, honestly, ten commandments is still way too many to hold onto (unless you’re a Rabbinical scholar). What were those super-pithy five?

People Before Technology.
Simplify, Simplify, Simplify. (with a strikethrough on the second two)
First Earn Trust.
Try, Fail, Repeat.
Get Better Together.

Combined with terse single-sentence explanations, experimental definitions (like ‘your silos should be invisible to me’) to clarify how customers would experience the commandment, and operational definitions (like ‘management is not your mama’) to codify how teams would act on it, people were off to the races — checking in periodically with management to make sure they were on the right track and, eventually, even going so far as to rewrite the way they test NPS to make sure they were nailing it for customers. Pretty soon, all the head nodding turned into actual, concerted doing.


So, what makes a good commandment? It should give an organization a clear benchmark — something to measure decisions against. Is this simplifying? Am I earning trust? Or am I just trying to get this feature out? It helps define a larger set of laws, not just a manager’s whim.

It should be applicable to the day-to-day — something that is meaningful to the rank-and-file in heat of the moment. Is this feature meeting a real human need? Or is it just technology for technology’s sake? Am I really risking failure if I greenlight this idea? Or am I playing it safe or phoning it it? It helps codify the vision in a personal, granular way.

And, lastly, it should rally people to a higher purpose — something that demonstrates a commitment to, well, goodess. Is this us being our better selves? Are we really in this for the right reasons? Or are we just reacting, doing whatever it takes to hit our numbers? It helps inspire action and fuel deep ownership of the outcome.

Which, truth be told, shouldn’t really feel like a miracle.